Young America. The Daguerreotypes of Southworth & Hawes. George Eastman House International Center of Photography
Reviews Curators Contributors Order Catalog
YOUNG AMERICA
BIOGRAPHIES
FAMILY
STUDIO
PUBLIC PORTRAITURE
PORTRAIT ART
COLORING
POSTMORTEM PORTRAITURE
THE DEATH OF PAIN
THE PARLOR STEREOSCOPE
DAGUERREOTYPE PROCESS
PERMANENCE
PRESENTATION NOTE
HOME

 

SITTER BIOGRAPHIES return to | PUBLIC PORTRAITURE


Daniel Webster
American (1782–1852)
Orator, Lawyer, Statesman, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, Secretary of State

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Daniel Webster], 1851. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Gift of Edward Southworth Hawes in memory of his father Josiah Johnson Hawes.

In 1830, Webster delivered his inspiring words: “Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!” His 1850 “Constitution and the Union” speech intended to influence public opinion in favor of compromise concerning the questions of slavery. “I speak today for the preservation of the Union. Hear me for my cause.”


 

Lemuel Shaw
American (1781–1861)
Chief Justice of Massachusetts

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Lemuel Shaw], ca. 1850-51. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes.

Shaw was the draughtsman for the first municipal charter of the city of Boston and was appointed chief justice in 1830. His daughter married the author Herman Melville. It is speculated that Melville’s literary work Bartleby was inspired by Justice Shaw’s life during his landmark case of Brown v. Kendall.

^ return to top

William Appleton
American (1786–1862)
U.S. Representative, Merchant, Banker

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[William Appleton], ca. 1850-55. Boston Athenaeum.

Born in Brookfield, Mass., Appleton moved to Boston in 1807
to pursue the mercantile business. He served as president of the Boston Branch of the U.S. Bank from 1832–1836, and was later elected to Congress in 1851. One of Boston’s society leaders, Appleton helped to found the Thomas Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind and held an influential position at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

^ return to top

Calvin Ellis Stowe
American (1802–1886)
Educator, Biblical Scholar, Writer, Advocate of Public Education and Teacher Training

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Calvin Ellis Stowe], ca. 1850-52. George Eastman House, Gift of Alden Scott Boyer.

Stowe graduated from Andover Theological Seminary in Andover, Massachusetts. While professor of Biblical literature at Lane Theological Seminary, he met and married Harriet Elizabeth Beecher. In 1867, he published his best-selling work, The Origin and History of the Books of the Bible.

^ return to top

Rufus Choate
American (1799–1859)
Jurist, Statesman, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, “The Great American Advocate”

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Rufus Choate], ca. 1850.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of I. N. Phelps Stokes, Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes, 1937 (37.14.48).

“His shock of raven hair, his wildly flashing eye, his gaunt frame…his restless action, and above all his strangely musical voice and rhythmical delivery, arrested and held attention in an uncanny, a witchlike manner, unearthly in every note, look and movement.”

^ return to top

Alvin Adams
American (1804–1877)
Entrepreneur, Businessman, Founder Adams & Co. [later the Adams Express Co.]

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Alvin Adams], ca. 1850. George Eastman House.

From “two men, a boy and one wheelbarrow,” Adams built the largest express shipping company on the East Coast—reaching across the country and nearly around the world. Through this he played a significant role in westward migration, the California Gold Rush, and the Civil War.

^ return to top

Charles Sumner
American (1811–1874)
U.S. Senator, One of the Founders of the Free Soil Party

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Charles Sumner], ca. 1850-55. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Gift of Edward Southworth Hawes in memory of his father Josiah Johnson Hawes.

Senator Charles Sumner believed that slavery was sectional and freedom national. He denounced the Kansas-Nebraska Bill of 1856 as “a hateful embrace of slavery.” In response to his speech, Congressman Preston S. Brooks of South Carolina severely beat Sumner with a cane in the Senate chamber. It took him three years to recover.

^ return to top

Reverend Rollin Heber Neale, DD
American (1808–1879)
Pastor of the First Church, Boston

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Reverend Rollin Heber Neale], ca. 1850-55. George Eastman House, Gift of Alden Scott Boyer.

Rev. Neale was one of the most eloquent and successful preachers, presiding over the First Church of Boston for nearly 40 years. He published The Burning Bush, a sermon on the death of Abraham Lincoln, and a collection of revival hymns. Rev. Neale believed in separation of church and state. He gave an impassioned address on the death of John Brown.

^ return to top

Cassius Marcellus Clay
American (1810–1903)
Anti-slavery Leader, Major General of Union Army

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Cassius Marcellus Clay], ca. 1850. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Gift of Landon T. Clay.

Clay was a pro-emancipationist who founded the antislavery newspaper True American in 1845 (later known as The Examiner). One of the founding members of the Republican Party, Clay played a major role in preventing France from intervening in the Civil War, served as U.S. minister to Russia, and helped negotiate the purchase of Alaska in 1867.

^ return to top

Commodore Charles Morris
American (1784–1856)
Naval Commander, Member of the Board of Naval Commissioners, Supervisor of the Naval Academy in Annapolis

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Commodore Charles Morris], ca. 1850-55. R. Bruce Duncan.

A distinguished figure in the United States Navy, Commodore Morris was particularly recognized for his leadership during the War of 1812. He served as executive officer on the USS Constitution, popularly known as “Old Iron Sides.”

^ return to top

Donald McKay
Scottish (?), b. 1809
Great Builder of Clipper Ships

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Donald McKay], ca. 1850-55. Massachusetts Historical Society.

“Mr. McKay is a man of mark in his personal appearance, which betrays his Scotch origin and his iron energy.…He is a leading man of great class, without which there can be no merchants, no commerce, no sailors—for what are all these without ships, swift ships to traverse all waters?”

^ return to top

Baron James de Rothschild
German/French (?) (1792–1868)
Banker, Philanthropist

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Baron James Rothschild, in Oval Vignette], 1850-55. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Gift of Edward Southworth Hawes in memory of his father Josiah Johnson Hawes.

Born into the most famous and influential European banking dynasty, James, the youngest of five brothers, founded the House of Rothschild’s Paris branch and was regarded with royal eminence.

^ return to top

Gaetano (Cagetan) Bedini
Italian (1806–1864)
Cardinal and Diplomat

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Gaetano Bedini], 1853. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; transfer from the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

In 1853, Pope Pius IX commissioned Bedini to examine the state of ecclesiastical affairs in the United States. His tour of America was received with a series of anti-Catholic demonstrations and violent riots. After his successful return to Europe, he was elevated to the rank of Cardinal and in 1861 became the Bishop of Viterbo and Toscanella.

^ return to top

Lola Montez (Maria Dolores Eliza Rosanna Gilbert)
Irish (1818–1861)
Dancer, Adventuress

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Lola Montez], ca. 1851. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Gift of Edward Southworth Hawes in memory of his father Josiah Johnson Hawes.

“…a devastating beauty, enslaving the hearts of powerful and famous men as she danced seductively on stages all over the world…Her beauty was reputed to conceal a physical courage as great as any man’s.…” Renowned for her spirit and defiant will, Montez traveled the world and gained international notoriety for her liaison with King Ludwig I of Bavaria.

^ return to top

Lajos Kossuth
Hungarian (1802–1894)
Hungarian Statesman

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Louis Kossuth and Ferencz Pulszky], 1852. George Eastman House, Gift of Alden Scott Boyer.

Kossuth was a popular hero and leader of Hungary’s struggle for independence from Austria. During his exile from Hungary, Kossuth traveled to the United States in 1851, seeking support for his cause and appealing to the Young America movement for intervention.

^ return to top

Annie Adams Fields (Mrs. James T. Fields)
American (1834–1915)
Hostess to Boston’s Literary Society, Poet, Author, Social Worker, Advocate for the Poor

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Annie Adams Fields], ca. 1855-60. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of I. N. Phelps Stokes, Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes.

Described as a “vision of youth & beauty,” Adams charmed and entranced Boston society, making the Fields’s home “the most famous gathering place in all America.” Her most popular book, Authors and Friends, is a collection of her best essays and is about her social circle, including Longfellow, Emerson, Holmes, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Celia Thaxter, and Whittier.

^ return to top

James T. Fields
American (1817–1881)
Publisher, Editor, Author

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[James Thomas Fields], ca. 1855-60. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of I. N. Phelps Stokes, Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes.

Partner in the firm of Ticknor and Fields, James T. Fields published works by many of the foremost American authors of the time. He became editor of the Atlantic Monthly magazine and author of Poems (1849), Yesterdays with Authors (1872), and Hawthorne (1876).

^ return to top

Dorothea Dix
American (1802–1887)
Humanitarian, Social Reformer, Advocate for the Mentally Ill

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Dorothea Dix], ca. 1849. Marilyn A. & Nicholas M. Graver.

In 1841, Dix began an unstoppable crusade to improve conditions for the mentally ill. During the 1850s, she established humane government hospitals across the nation and around the world. At the outbreak of the Civil War, she organized the Army Nursing Corps and fought to publicly recognize women’s roles in medicine.

^ return to top

Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
American (1811–1896)
Author, Educator

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Harriet Beecher Stowe], ca. 1843-45. Hallmark Photographic Collection.

Stowe is best known for having written Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The Ladies Almanac for 1854 noted that “Her writings were of a high moral tone, and deservedly popular. The world-wide fame of ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin,’ has placed her name conspicuously on the scroll of human remembrance.”

^ return to top

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
American (1807–1882)
Poet

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[Henry Wadsworth Longfellow], ca. 1850. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of I. N. Phelps Stokes, Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes.

Longfellow attended Bowdoin College and was a classmate of Nathaniel Hawthorne. He studied modern languages and became professor of modern languages first at Bowdoin and then at Harvard College. Longfellow’s best-known works include Evangeline, The Song of Hiawatha, The Courtship of Miles Standish, and his poem “Paul Revere’s Ride.”

^ return to top

William Hickling Prescott
American (1796–1859)
Historian, “America’s first scientific historian”

photo of Albert S. Southworth

[William Hickling Prescott], ca. 1850-55. Russell MacAusland.

Blinded in his left eye during his junior year at Harvard College, Prescott composed portions of his works using a noctograph—a nineteenth-century writing grid with parallel wires that guided a stylus over a chemically treated surface. He is best known for his three-volume History of the Conquest of Mexico (1843) and two-volume History of the Conquest of Peru (1847).

^ return to top

 

© 2005-2006 GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE — Web design and construction by Robert Lau & BizBuzz Interactive, LLC